"E Nānā i ke Kumu" (先人を見習う)

"E Nānā i ke Kumu"
(Look to the Source)
        As we approach the 2nd Annual Chigasaki Makana Hula Festival, my puʻuwai (heart) is filled with aloha to be here to see Kazuko "Makana" Selig's dream come to fruition!
   Hula is alive in Japan, however Makana's dream was to educate those who have a love for this unique form of dance, that hula is not just for show performance and competition but so much more. She was a linguist, who spoke Hawaiian and understood that language is the heart of our hula, as it conveys the thoughts of the composer of the mele and its inner "kaona" (hidden meaning).   
Before Hawaiian was a written language, our forefathers committed to memory their genealogies, oli and mele as a way to pass on the information and traditions which they held so dear.  They are the "source" which we look to and must continue to reference to ensure that the Hawaiian perspective is passed down to our haumāna.
Training in Hawaiian language is an integral part of the hula.  As kumu, it is important to have some understanding in Hawaiian language so as to skillfully choreograph the hula and properly convey the story that is being told through the poetry.  As students also, it is important to have an understanding of the dances that have been taught and thus be able to express the feeling of the mele and appreciate these traditional and timeless compositions.
We, as kumu have a kuleana (responsibility) to keep these mele and hula intact in the way that they have been passed down to us from our Kumu and those Masters who have come before us so as to educate our haumāna. The relationship of kumu and haumāna are tied together, each having their own kuleana in passing down the knowledge that has been acquired.  So as we look forward to this hula event, we must continue to "nānā i ke kumu" (look to the source) and ensure that the traditions that we have been taught, the foundation upon which hula has been passed down, continue to receive the respect upon which it is founded. 

Naʻu nō me ke aloha

Kumu Ipolani Vaughan




"E Nānā i ke Kumu" (先人を見習う)
        第2回茅ヶ崎マカナ・フラ・フェスティバルの開会がせまり、かずこセリッグ(マカナ)の夢の結実をこの目で見ることが出来ると思うと今、私の心はアロハでいっぱいです!
   日本にはフラの愛好家の方々が大変多くいます。が、マカナの夢は、ハワイのその独特な踊りを愛する方達に、フラがただショーやコンペティションのためだけにあるのではなく、それ以上のものであると言うことを教育することでした。彼女は言語学者としてハワイ語を話すだけではなく、ハワイ語は私たちが踊るフラの心であること知っていました。フラは、作曲者の曲についての考えや、その真意であるカオナ(裏の意味)を伝えることを知っていたのです。   
ハワイ語が口語であった頃、ハワイの祖先たちは、家系図、祈り、メレなどを全て記憶し、私たちが敬愛する情報や伝統を継承してきました。彼らこそが私たちが尊敬する「先人」であり、私たちは彼らを引き続き参照しながら、ハワイアンとしての物の見方を私たちの生徒に正しく継承しなければなりません。
フラではハワイ語のトレーニングは不可欠です。クムとして曲に振り付けをする際に、詩によって伝えようとされている意味を正しく表現するためには、ハワイ語を相応に理解していることが大切です。生徒としても、教えて貰った曲の意味を理解していることは大切で、意味を知っていれば、踊る際の感情表現にも役に立ち、伝統的な曲や、幾世期もの時代を超えた曲に対する感謝の気持ちを持つことが出来ます。
これらのメレやフラをクムとして生徒たちに教える際、我々のクムや先代のフラマスター達から学び受け継いだメレやフラそのままを守るというクレアナ、「責任」が私たちにはあります。クムと生徒は堅い絆で結ばれ、自分が得た知識を継承するクレアナ、「責任」がそれぞれにあります。このフラのイベントに向けて、今まで継承されてきたフラの礎である、私たちが習った伝統が、これからも尊敬され続けるよう、私たちは「先人を見習い」("nānā i ke kumu")続けるべきだと思います。

Naʻu nō me ke aloha(心より愛を込めて)
Kumu Ipolani Vaughanクム・イポラニ・ヴォーン

翻訳:キャロル瀬尾